C-Corp Service

Our 3 Step Process

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We prepare

Next we prepare and file and serve the necessary documentswe prepare and file.

your finalized

Finally, your finalized filed documents will be finalized filed documents sent to you!

SILVER

$200

State Fees$10
Package Fee $200
Preparing & Filing the Articles of Organization
5 Name Searches
Online & Email Support
Online Access to your Documents
Your Total : $200

GOLD

$500

State Fees$10
Package Fee $500
Preparing & Filing the Articles of Organization
Unlimited Name Search
EIN Business Tax Id Number
Corporate Kit with Seal
Business Banking Account
Logo Design
Your Total : $500

PLATINUM

$900

State Fees$10
Package Fee $900
Preparing &Filling the Articles of organization
Unlimited Name Search
EIN Business Tax Id Number
Corporate Kit With Seal
Business BankingAccount
WordPress 5 CMS pages – Informative Website
Logo Design
FedEx Delivery
File Statement of information
Certified Copies of Articles
Online Access to your Documents
Phone & Email Support
Website Hosting
Your Total : $900

Overview

A C-corp is the most common type of corporation—essentially the default variety. Named for the subchapter of the Internal Revenue Code—subchapter “C”—under which its tax designation is described, tax reasons are what make a C-corp a C-corp. (S-corps and C-corps are no different under state corporation laws—only by way of the federal tax code.) With a C-corp designation, a corporate income tax is paid first by the corporation with a federal tax return (Form 1120) as required by the IRS. Shareholders must then pay taxes on personal income at the individual level for any gains realized from dividends. C-corps have no major restrictions on who can own shares, meaning other businesses and entities both in and outside the United States can have ownership. There is also no limit to the total number of shareholders. C-corps, like all corporations, must follow operating rules called “corporate formalities” in order to maintain corporate protections.

C-Corp FAQ’s

C corporations can have foreign owners, unlimited shareholders, and multiple classes of stock. Winner: C corps. S corps are suited for smaller, domestic businesses that want to treat all owners the same way. C corps give companies unlimited growth potential and flexible options for ownership and profit distribution.
A major disadvantage to C corporations that suffer losses, unlike the losses of an S corporation, is that the losses do not pass through to the shareholders. Losses can only be deducted against corporate income, although they can be carried back or forward to offset income in those tax years.
Advantages of a corporation include personal liability protection, business security and continuity, and easier access to capital. Disadvantages of a corporation include it being time-consuming and subject to double taxation, as well as having rigid formalities and protocols to follow.
One way to ensure that business profits are only taxed once is to organize the business as a “flow-through” or “pass-through” entity. When a business is organized as a pass-through entity, profits flow directly to the owner or owners. In turn, these are not taxed at the corporate level and again at the personal level.
Officers of C corporations are strictly paid on a salary basis. They may be able to obtain bonuses, but their primary source of income is their salary. In an S corporation, an owner can choose to take regular draws or distributions in addition to their normal salary.
They are called C corporations because they are bound by the rules and regulations of subchapter C of the Internal Revenue Code. Additionally, almost all C corporations are publicly traded companies.
What is a C corp? A C corp is a business structure in which owners (or shareholders) are taxed separately from the entity. Shareholders are owners of the corporation, each having a fractional interest in the whole. A shareholder could own a single share of the company, or millions of shares.
There are no restrictions on ownership in a C corporation - you can have as many owners as you want, and foreign nationals can own shares in a C corporation.
The headline corporate income tax rate for 2021 is 25%. The rate will fall to 23% for 2022.
After all, income from a C corporation is taxed twice. The corporation pays tax on its net income. Then, shareholders also pay tax on dividend distributions they receive. In contrast, income from an S corporation is taxed once at the shareholder level.
Double taxation occurs when a C-corp generates a profit for the year AND distributes that profit to shareholders in the form of a dividend. It's called double taxation because the profits are taxed first at the corporate level and again by the recipient of dividends at the individual level.
The Pros and Cons of C-Corporations: Pro: Personal Liability Protection. Con: Administrative Responsibilities. Pro: It's Easier to Raise Additional Capital. 4 days ago
Retaining corporate earnings. You can avoid double taxation by keeping profits in the business rather than distributing it to shareholders as dividends. If shareholders don't receive dividends, they're not taxed on them, so the profits are only taxed at the corporate rate.
If you do a quick read of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) you'll see that the new C Corporation tax rate is 21% while the top individual rate is 37%. Also, individuals are allowed a 20% deduction for passthrough income.
Why choose a c corporation? C corporations provide limited liability protection to owners, who are called shareholders, meaning owners are typically not personally responsible for business debts and liabilities.
C corporations can have foreign owners, unlimited shareholders, and multiple classes of stock. Winner: C corps. S corps are suited for smaller, domestic businesses that want to treat all owners the same way. C corps give companies unlimited growth potential and flexible options for ownership and profit distribution.
“C corporation” or “C corp” stands for “corporation.” The “C” comes from the fact that C corp income is taxed under the subchapter C of the Internal Revenue Code.
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